Tag: illustration

Paula Rego – Portugese Painter

Paula Rego – Portugese Painter

I have recently been looking at the work of Paula Rego. At first, i didn’t think much of her paintings, they looked really odd and the dark colours made them look rather disturbing.

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The old republican 2005
http://www.artnet.com/artists/paula-rego/the-old-republic-a-PV12NWpO8idD6YDjhpZLAA2

After learning more about her work and the stories behind them, I think she is remarkable! Her pieces are so powerful! Her paintings tell a story of her life and what she has been through. A use of nostalgia, by looking at scenes of her childhood and putting a story there. It is both a physic and emotional experience.

She says that if you paint pictures, it’s about whats inside of you and what comes out. We all have secrets and many of us show it in our work.

One series of paintings that stood out to me were the paintings of women having backstreet abortions.

Back then abortions were illegal in Portugal. There was a referendum to legalise it, but nobody had bothered to vote. She wanted to become involved, to make a change because they desperately needed proper clinics. So she did these explicit paintings of young girls to make people aware, because she felt people needed to know how important is was for women to have abotions legalised. She had the power to change the law.

 

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Image Reference: https://www.abbothall.org.uk/abbot/artwork/paula-rego

 

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Image Reference: https://uk.pinterest.com/baxte5/paula-rego/?lp=true

Paula Rego herself, had a hard life. She had back street abortions herself and men at that time didn’t care much for women. Her father suffered from depression and her mother didn’t teach her much. Over the years she had lost her innocence.

One quote i liked from Paula Rego was:

“If that person understands your work very well, they understand you really well”.

 

 

Decay & Power Part 2

Decay & Power Part 2

So today i watched a talk by David Polka, a street artist. I thought about his opinion on how street artists portray death and decay and i think that he has an interesting opinion and i agree with his thoughts and feelings on this subject.

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He says that cities and olden buildings express decay. They speak for the passage of time and human presence. They’re inspiring with there cool textures and the way that we can relate to architecture. You can see all the processes that had happened, you can see the contrast of seeing man-made structures return to the way they were from. It opens up new questions when you see the processes happen, like overgrown plants etc.

He says that as a graffiti artist he wants to leave a mark on the world. We all do because if we don’t, we feel lifeless. Graffiti art is highly controlled visual advertising on blank walls. It makes people feel that they can give an opinion when they look at it because its not like going to the gallery, its more open and it makes people think. This is an example of the power art can give and another opinion on decay.

If you’d like to watch the video i have been referring to, you can watch it here:

 

Nostalgia Part 2

Recently, i watched a talk from Bruce Mcall on nostalgia, a future that will never happen.

Bruce Mcall is a commercial artist for the New Yorker. He says that in his work, he uses something called  “Retro-futurism”. Which is looking back to see how yesterday views tomorrow, which he says is always wrong.

The 1930’s in his opinion, was the peak time for that because of the depression and it was a way to get away from the present and to look at the future, which was always optimistic. They thought that technology was going to help them get through it.

78724_800x600.jpgA retro-future that never happened — full of flying cars, polo-playing tanks and the RMS Tyrannic, “The Biggest Thing in All the World.”

He then talks about something called “Techno archaeology”, an example of this is his poster named “The Hindenburg” which was from 1947 looking at the day all american families have them.

He goes on to talk about “Faux Nostalgia” which is the yearning for times that never happened.

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Bruce Mcall says that nostalgia is the most utterly useless human emotion. I don’t totally agree but I see the point. Nostalgia if taken to extreme becomes a mild case of depression and self-deception. The past is never as great or as bad as it seems and nor will the future be as wonderful or as terrible as we can imagine.

 

A link to Broce Mcall’s talk on this https://youtu.be/fOk6HQaNpdE